Wednesday, 29 January 2014

Three unrelated health thoughts

Yesterday I saw some apples in a store marked “for juicing” because they were old and wrinkly.  Apples keep through the winter of course and retain many excellent nutrients; but, just a word about Vitamin C – something I learned someplace along the journey and stashed away in my mental archive.  The Vitamin C in fruit does us good, but originally the plant had it in mind for its own consumption.  While the fruit looks plump and juicy, it still has lots of Vit C in it (well, levels vary I guess, but even so).  You can tell when the stores of Vit C are running low because the fruit starts to fade and get wrinkly.  Even writing this I wonder – is that true?  Isn’t it just the water levels diminishing?  But then again, Vit C is water soluble, so . . .  But I pass that on for your consideration.

For those of you who like herbal teas, there’s a star among teas from Organic India.  Their enterprise is wonderful anyway.  The couple who started/run it went to India to study under a spiritual teacher and stayed on.  They live in an area affected by the Green Revolution – Monsanto et al – where many of the farmers had committed suicide by drinking the pesticides that were part of the destructive package that had ruined them.  Organic India was started to bring new hope and revivify the land.  At first the farmers felt suspicious of Westerners with bright ideas, especially after their experiences hitherto, but eventually a man with just three acres was willing to give it a go – and his little farm thrived.  From that small beginning, Organic India has grown into a business bringing hope to thousands of Indian farmers and restoring health to their land.  The particular tea I love is this one.  I cannot adequately describe how light, subtle, fragrant and delicious it is.  A heavenly tea.  They sell it on Amazon.


Sometimes I like to follow the old Book of Common Prayer for my quiet time.  It starts with a confession that includes these words: “We have left undone those things which we ought to have done and done those things we ought not to have done, and there is no health in us.”  And it made me think about the connections between health and responsibility.  I mean, obviously if a landmine blows off your leg that’s not your fault; but in the daily choices we make each little thing can be a step towards health, peace and shining light.  May God bless your way today.  May you walk in the light.  xxx

11 comments:

Ganeidaz Knot said...

There is such peace in the liturgy. I don't like it for every day ~ but sometimes those measured cadences are just right. It is one of my earliest memories of how lovely words can be, with the sunlight flooding narrow stained glass windows & warming an old wooden floor. The new church was big & functional & ugly ~ as is the new prayer book. lol I like the old.

margaret said...

I couldn't stop crying when I read about farmers drinking pesticides in India because they're in debt to foreign agro-industries - and even then the debt passes to the widow and crucifies her. I will definitely be buying my tea from Organic India from now on. Did you see the link to Fabindia clothing too? http://www.fabindia.com/intl/
Thank you so much for finding such marvellous tea.

Suze said...

I grew up in the Anglican church and I miss the prayers. Some of them are so beautiful and succinct.

Pilgrim said...

I love those old words, too. I grew up on the King James, and still prefer it. I have a modern Book of Common Prayer (American Episcopal), but also an old American one pubished in 1789, but printed in 1936. I really like the old one, but its print is very small. I would like to get a new copy of an old version, but find the options confusing. 1662 or 1928? Even after reading Jacob's book, I'm not sure. He does shed light on the original meaning of some of the old terminologys, which is helpful. This is probably self-evident, in your milieu. Among my friends, the only people I know who use set prayers are Catholic.

Pilgrim said...

Ok, I took a leaf from the tree of knowledge that is Google. It seems the 1928 version is American, and a shift along the spectrum back toward Catholic; the 1662 is probably the way to go--traditional forms and language, and used much more widely across the Anglican communion. The interaction between British religion and politics that comes out in the history of the book is fascinating.

Pen Wilcock said...

Hi friends - thanks for your interesting comments - and for the link to FabIndia, Margaret! xxx

BLD in MT said...

Thanks for the tea link and the interesting thoughts, Pen.

Anonymous said...

Small world, they sell Organic India Tulsi at my local health food co-op in Minnesota. I have some of their red mango tulsi in my cupboard right now (although it tastes a little medicinal to me). I have been drinking mulberry leaf tea of late, both cold and hot as I watch my health and blood sugar levels. Thanks for the beautiful prayer.
DMW

Pen Wilcock said...

Hooray - I'm glad they sell it there! x

Jenna said...

Thinking of you when hearing about the storm headed there, Pen. I don't know if it's headed your way exactly, but I pray you'll be safe in any case. c:

Pen Wilcock said...

Thank you - yes, it's going to be breezy!