Sunday, 7 September 2014

Inverted

Well, this may sound like stating the obvious to you, but it came as a new thought to me – indeed, most thoughts do, as I grow older and more forgetful!

The Co-op where they sell good bread and tinned fish and the best fresh orange juice and other things I wanted, is the far side of the valley. Down a steep hill, then up a steep hill, and the same coming home of course.

And it dawned on me, coming home, walking over a valley is exactly the same as walking over a mountain. A valley is an upside down mountain.

I don’t think I ever though of that before.

And I think, if what lay between me and the Co-op was a mountain instead of a valley, I’d find it too daunting to cross. I’d think it was way too difficult – “I’m not going to the Co-op! I mean, cripes! You have to cross a mountain!”

Whereas crossing a valley feels easy. But in reality is exactly the same.


I feel sure there are some life lessons in there somewhere . . .


17 comments:

Rapunzel said...

Perhaps we should look at more things upside down and see what we discover?
You do come up with the best ideas!

Pen Wilcock said...

:0) Waving! xx

Elizabeth @ The Garden Window said...

I do love this idea - thank you!

Pen Wilcock said...

:0) xx

SylvanHome said...

The inversion that stunned me in that surprise sort of way surfaced one evening in my chair while processing a conflict I was experiencing with my spiritual companion of that time. I picked up the Course in Miracles and opened it randomly to "the thought that you are being attacked is the same thought as attacking someone." I think that is an accurate remembering of the language. Just reading that, not thinking about it, the word "innocence" instantly & emphatically imposed itself in my mind. It precipitated a flash vision of undifferentiated unity with my friend and a prolonged stretch (10 hours) of unsual serenity, which luckily I recorded in my notebook. That was such a counterintuitive thought, that unlike that evening, I have to walk myself to the same holding of it now. But responding here to your valley/mountain flash, their seemingly opposite meanings also dissolved with a momentarily repositioned view.

Pen Wilcock said...

Exactly so! Thank you! xx

Suze said...

There is something profound there somewhere. I love how life makes you take notice sometimes.

Pen Wilcock said...

:0) xx

gail said...

I hadn't thought of that either. How amazing. Just a thought though, Perhaps the mountain might actually be the best way to go because the hardest part would have to be done first and then it would be an easy walk down hill at the end. (both there and back) I like to do the hard part while I'm fresh.
Loving you thoughts lately Pen.
Blessings Gail.

Pen Wilcock said...

Yes - I like to have the easy part at the end too. So the mountain is actually preferable! Who would have thought it? xx

BLD in MT said...

I think I've said this before, but: I adore the way your minds works. Ha! I'd never thought of that before either--even though Matt and I are planning a trip to the Grand Canyon and he has repeatedly tried to explain it to me as an inverted mountain. (I don't think I "get" the Grand Canyon yet. Its too big to picture in my mind's eye.)

Katrina Green said...

You're wonderful! Tee hee, I suppose it depends on which point of your journey you are contemplating it. It takes more energy to move from being safe and still indoors than to keep going when already out there. So, a valley would seem preferable from the perspective of contemplating starting the trip and a mountain once nearly to the top. The moral should be either, don't think, or, don't stop walking.
(No, that's just silly.) x

Pen Wilcock said...

:0D

Hi Beth! Hi Katrina!

Waving!

xx

Rapunzel said...

Katrina is exactly right though--don't think and don't stop walking.
Because the journey isn't really about how far from the bottom of the mountain to the top, or how far from the top of the ridge down into the valley--the moment of actual effort is just how far from where your foot is Right Now to where you choose to place it next, and that is never really very far. The trouble with mountains and valleys is the thought we put into them.

We live in a valley, quite steep and a half mile down. I thought it quite intimidating when I first moved down here, but them my daughter came down with the grandbabies and I found if we're chatting as we go neither of us notice the distance or the steepness.
It's thinking that gets me in a muddle more than actual life.

Pen Wilcock said...

Yes, I find the same - I like it when we go to the store together, then I just enjoy the walk. x

Leslie said...

I sure have missed seeing you on Facebook. (Don't think I didn't notice! ) I so enjoy the way you think, and write. Although I cannot make the time to read your blog and books consistently, when I do, it's like sharing with a special friend. Thank you for that.
In His love, Who first loved us,
Leslie

Pen Wilcock said...

Hello my friend! How lovely to see you here! I think of you often - you are in my heart and prayers. God bless you and your family today xxx